Culture



Orientation opposites: should straight actors be allowed to play gay?

6th January 2022

Margaret Hartness explains why sexual orientation should not stunt screen talent. In 2015, at a press conference for his film Legend, Tom Hardy quietly shut down a reporter who asked about his sexuality with one simple question: “Why?”. Why was it anyone’s business? The reporter had no answer to give. Or, if he did, his ...


Film school versus free spirits: does good directing truly depend on years of study?

5th January 2022

Marine examines the pros and cons of the output of creators who deferred to the traditional academic route, compared those who were self-taught and experimented on their own terms. When asked who my favourite director is, I answer without hesitation every time: Darren Aronofsky. I fell in love with cinema thanks to Requiem for a ...


Review: The French Dispatch

2nd January 2022

Wes Anderson delivers another accomplished 100 minutes of psychotically symmetrical quirk. For a traditional film bro and lover of black and white films (such as Casablanca, Hitchcock classics Vertigo and Psycho, or even one of Fritz Lang´s bests, Blue Gardenia) contemporary motion pictures may pale in comparison to these giants. But I believe even the ...


Review: Whistler: Art and Legacy @ Hunterian Art Gallery

28th December 2021

James McNeill Whistler’s life and legacy are beautifully exhibited at the Hunterian. James McNeill Whistler was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, but spent his working life in Europe. He studied topography at the United States Military, and had family who constructed railways, bridges, and ships which shaped Whistler’s interest in art and landscape. Though he never ...


Why do we feel pressure to read the classics?

28th December 2021

Elena Adams questions whether we should read the classics just because we feel we should. Classic literature is intimidating. They’re full of big confusing words, can be a bit dull at times, and are (for the most part) full of dark and depressing imagery. Of course, that’s not always the case but classics aren’t classics ...


Rereading old favourites

28th December 2021

Writer Kate McIntosh discusses the pros and cons of rereading old favourite novels when there are so many new titles to delve into. In March, award-winning writer Derek Owusu appeared on BBC Radio 4’s A Good Read, in which two guests discuss with presenter Harriett Gilbert a book of their choice. Owusu chose F. Scott ...


Portrait of a Scottish Artist: Joan Eardley

28th December 2021

Joan Eardley’s paintings resonate with countless Scots due to the exploration of the country’s conflicting dualities in her work. Joan Eardley (1921-1963) produced some of the most significant works in the history of Scottish art during the mid-20th century, splitting her time between painting the street children of Glasgow’s East End and the wild sea ...


RuPaul’s *Bro* Race

28th December 2021

Writer Marcus Hyka examines the recent cishet addition to Ru Paul’s highly successful reality show of competing drag queens, and its implications. “It’s finally time for a straight White man to have their piece of the pie”, jokes Maddy Morphosis, the first cisgender, heterosexual drag queen to be competing on RuPaul’s Drag Race in the ...


Review: Sex, Love, and Goop

28th December 2021

Sophie considers the Goop and the bad of the Netflix show, helmed by guru Gwyenth Paltrow, that explores sexual health and female pleasure. As Gwyneth Paltrow’s warbling “Hello!” echoed through the dark dredges of my room, I put aside my fourth-year essays for one more day to indulge in Netflix’s newest gripping and harsh commentary ...


Reading challenges for the new year

28th December 2021

Patrick Gaffey offers a method to make reading more books your New Year’s resolution. As 2021 draws to a close, many of us will be counting off our last winter reads, and planning which books to explore next year. Users of websites such as Goodreads and StoryGraph often set annual reading challenges, establishing a minimum ...