Science & Tech



Bridging the divide between arts and sciences

4th April 2020

  Imogen Miller Culture Columnist – Music Should scientists study moral philosophy? In the middle of the wilderness, with no contact with the outside world, two groups of twelve year old boys are forced to compete for resources. They reach their limits, hysteria ensues and the two groups become violent. You may think I’m describing ...


Riding the gravitational wave

23rd March 2020

Graeme Eddols Writer Graeme Eddols explores the significance of the University’s contribution to gravitational wave research. Gravitational waves are caused by some of the most energetic events in the universe. Their existence was predicted by Albert Einstein over 100 years ago in his famous General Theory of Relativity, and it has taken almost the same ...


Is Airbnb ruining our cities?

20th March 2020

Marine Fleury Writer Marine Fleury analyses the negative effects of Airbnb on the availability of housing From using air mattresses for an informal bed and breakfast to becoming the preferred short-term rent platform worldwide, Airbnb has grown incredibly fast in the 13 years since it was founded. Such growth seems set to continue, evidenced by ...


Aphantasia: Blind in the mind’s eye

17th March 2020

Max Kelly Travel Editor Max Kelly explores the condition in which people lack a mind’s eye, and its history. Try to picture your favourite meal. How does it look? Or perhaps, try to picture a colourful sunset. Could you do it? For people who suffer from aphantasia this is not possible. This condition means that ...


James Dean, the latest victim of nonconsensual digital re-creation

1st March 2020

Angus Gillies Deputy Culture Editor – Film and TV Cast in a new action film, should we be worried about the lack of ethics needed to recreate actors?  The last few months have given an alarming contemporary significance to the phrase “turn in one’s grave”. James Dean, counterculture icon and the star of classics Rebel ...


Why is Lake Chad drying up?

1st March 2020

Rebecca Scott Culture Editor Rebecca Scott examines the impact of the climate crisis on this vital body of water. Whilst it’s now common knowledge that our planet is undergoing an unprecedented and rapid period of global heating, it can be hard to visualise this in our daily lives here in Scotland; the rain stays lashing, ...


The UK-Africa Summit is a sign of the green economy conundrum

19th February 2020

Lucia Posteraro Multimedia Editor The climate crisis is hitting hardest in countries that contribute to it the least — how can the UK move to be part of the solution rather than part of the problem? The UK-Africa Summit, held in January in London, has highlighted a policy conundrum. On the one hand, Boris Johnson’s ...


What is quantum supremacy?

18th February 2020

Marianna Marcelline Science & Tech Editor Marianna Marcelline asks if Glasgow’s latest project will change the world. Packed into a one-square centimetre silicon chip, Google’s quantum CPU may be small in size, but certainly not in potency. The 54-qubit computer known as “Sycamore” contains an array of microscopic cables enabling it to perform calculations at ...


The future of medicine

16th February 2020

Victoria Chang Writer As part of our series on the future of work, Victoria Chang discusses the ethics and impact of technological innovation in medicine. It’s no secret that medicine is a hotbed for innovation. The impact of medical research on society can be world-changing; it affects everybody, no matter if you’re a medical student, ...


The future is fembots

10th February 2020

Holly Jennings Views Editor Think of the digital robot in your life. What’s her name? Is she Siri or Alexa? Maybe Cortana? Or perhaps you prefer something a little more fictional like Samantha or Ava? Whether she lives in your phone or your favourite film, it’s likely to be a she. As we steer ourselves ...