series



Musicians of Glasgow Uni: Loup Havenith

6th February 2021

A continuation of the Musicians of Glasgow Uni series, Music Editor Jodie Leith delivers some quick-fire questions to our music-making students. Highlighting the rich musical talent gracing our (online) lectures, we take a look at musician’s background, music, interests, and how they’re finding life as a student at UofG (in a pandemic). This time, The ...


Why should we unlearn?

5th February 2021

This new series uncovers what societal expectations our writers are working towards unlearning. In the first installment, Views Editor Emily Hay explores what unlearning is and why it’s so important. The rise of the Instagram infographics in 2020 brought with it a term which many had never come across before: unlearning. A quick google search ...


Hidden gems: Deep Red

2nd February 2021

For the first entry in our hidden gems series, in which writers offer their case for reappraisal of lost masterpieces, Alex Enaholo takes on Giallo with Dario Argento’s Deep Red. When I was 13 years old and watching Scream for the first time, everything about it called to me. The excessive violence – I mean, ...


Future World Changers: changing the world through poetry

14th January 2021

In this article, The Glasgow Guardian interviews Shehzar Doja, founder of The Luxembourg Review, and a PhD student of Creative Writing at the University of Glasgow. Shehzar’s passion for poetry and the impact it has had on his life made him want to use it to change the world. This ambition prompted him to apply ...


A book that changed my life: The Greeks

11th January 2021

Mahee Mustafa recounts what Ancient Greece can teach us about freedom. The most valuable thing one can glean from a work of literature is insight into one’s own psyche. Although command of language, deft characterisation, and excavation of universal themes are all important, a book is ultimately worth nothing if it does not reveal a ...


Family Canon: The (proletari)cat in the hat

31st December 2020

The first entry in our Family Canon series, covering the films and TV shows we watched over and over as children. The Cat in the Hat, the live-action adaptation of Dr. Seuss’ classic children’s book, reigns supreme in my family canon. Mike Myers’ chef-d’oeuvres operates on its own plane of existence – one of simultaneous ...


The science behind… a festive meal

23rd December 2020

In the first installment of a series, Sofia Della Sala explains the science behind cooking a turkey. Christmas: the time to gorge yourself on foods that you never eat at any other time of year, to lock chocolates away behind tiny numbered doors and wear hats made out of paper. It’s magical. Call me corny ...


Picking a bone: The quadruple threat: White, male, posh and English!

19th December 2020

Examining the partisan advantages aiding British actors. An unpalatable truth of the current UK acting industry is that it almost exclusively reserves its most glittering job prospects and abundance of praise for White, male, upper class actors from England. Unbiased sample of British talent should show more than just Anglo gentlemen who were Made in ...


Vent to views

18th December 2020

Your questions answered by our Views Editors. I’ve recently discovered what feels like a lump on my cervix. I know that there’s a million things this could be, but I’m automatically terrified it could be cancerous. I don’t want to seem over cautious if it’s nothing, so I don’t know who to turn to for ...


Family Canon: Pretty in Pink

13th December 2020

The first of our new Family Canon series. “I just want to let them know that they didn’t break me,” says Molly Ringwald in one of the final scenes of the seminal 1986 film Pretty in Pink, standing in her living room in her homemade pink dress, preparing to go to prom, *gasp*, solo. The ...