Books



Review: The Woman in the Window

26th January 2021

A psychological thriller that hits close to home When lockdown restrictions were brought down last spring, I found myself in a dilemma. I hadn’t read a proper book that wasn’t on my course list in over a year. I had become a lover of tech giants such as Twitter and Instagram, glued to my screen ...


MA in Creative Writing: are the fees worth it?

11th January 2021

Margaret explores the pros, the cons, and the alternatives to a Creative Writing post-grad. Say you enjoyed creative writing in school, so much so that you wished to become a writer. The thought “pick something sensible” leads you to English Literature, but after four years of studying it, you still feel that there’s more to ...


A book that changed my life: The Greeks

11th January 2021

Mahee Mustafa recounts what Ancient Greece can teach us about freedom. The most valuable thing one can glean from a work of literature is insight into one’s own psyche. Although command of language, deft characterisation, and excavation of universal themes are all important, a book is ultimately worth nothing if it does not reveal a ...


A book that changed my life: The Perks of Being a Wallflower

8th January 2021

How can one find in a book the strength to wade against the drag of anxiety and loneliness? An incessant creature of habit, throughout all six years of high school I had one ritual on the run up to the first day of school: re-reading my well-thumbed copy of The Perks of Being a Wallflower ...


The titles that made my 2020

30th December 2020

In a Spotify-style Book Wrap, Jordan shares her favourite reads. It would only be right to start by mentioning the first book I read this year, as part of a “50 books for 2020” challenge that I once again failed miserably at. Why Be Happy When You Can Be Normal by Jeanette Winterson is, despite ...


Review: Dolly Alderton’s Ghosts

29th December 2020

Alderton’s debut novel is an instant hit to get stuck into as the days get shorter and the nights get darker. When I heard that Dolly Alderton was back on the bookshelves this October, I couldn’t help but get excited. A few years ago, I read her 2018 memoir Everything I Know About Love and ...


Shuggie Bain: a story of poverty, addiction, and Glaswegian masculinity

24th December 2020

Lucy Dunn reviews this year’s Booker Prize Winner by Scottish-born Douglas Stuart. Starting and ending with a teenage Shuggie living alone, parentless, in a Southside bedsit, Douglas Stuart’s debut novel is raw, gripping, hopeful and devastating. In 1980s Thatcher-era Glasgow, the language is violence and the currency is sex. Not the commonly-portrayed white-collar patriarchy so ...


Stocking your bookshelf this Christmas

18th December 2020

Cosy up with one of Reilly’s festive recommendations. With his gravity-defying sleigh, eight flying reindeer, and the world’s most powerful passport, it looks as if St. Nick may be the only one travelling this Christmas. Of course, for those of us stuck at home, the holidays are not necessarily ruined. Many bibliophiles and homebodies have ...