Film & TV



Review: Malcolm & Marie

26th February 2021

Robin Fodor reviews the drama set over the course of one night, filmed during the pandemic. John David Washington, last seen by people who like that sort of thing in Christopher Nolan’s failed attempt to save cinema, Tenet, joins the surname-less Zendaya: they are Malcolm and Marie. Malcolm is a film director, not unlike Malcolm ...


Review: Wolfwalkers

4th February 2021

Finlay Chalmers reviews the new Apple TV+ animated film. From the moment Wolfwalkers starts, you’re plunged into a luscious forest of colour and natural beauty. This film is the third in the Irish Folklore trilogy by director Tomm Moore, after The Secret of Kells and Song of the Sea. The film is set in the ...


Hidden gems: Deep Red

2nd February 2021

For the first entry in our hidden gems series, in which writers offer their case for reappraisal of lost masterpieces, Alex Enaholo takes on Giallo with Dario Argento’s Deep Red. When I was 13 years old and watching Scream for the first time, everything about it called to me. The excessive violence – I mean, ...


White victimhood in Bridgerton’s rape scene

31st January 2021

Content warning: Contains description of a rape scene. Trey-Daniel Kyeremeh examines racial and gender dynamics in Shonda Rhimes’ latest Netflix hit. I watched all of Bridgerton in one night. As a fan of Shonda Rhimes, no convincing was needed to get me to watch this highly anticipated drama. Besides, it was something to pass the ...


Review: The Mandalorian season two

27th January 2021

The acclaimed show continues with new planets and old faces. Good things come to those who wait. After its highly successful first season, The Mandalorian has returned to our screens just in time for another lockdown. After the year we’ve had, it was perfect timing for Jon Favreau to reveal what happened to our favourite ...


Review: Ma Rainey

27th January 2021

Blues music is rooted in African American culture and experience. Ma Rainey lets you know that. Denzel Washington and George C. Wolfe’s production of Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom brings August Wilson’s 1982 play of the same title to life. Led by Viola Davis, Chadwick Boseman, and Glynn Turman, the all-star cast brings the blues to ...


Review: Lupin

26th January 2021

Netflix’s new French series is a charming and well-acted update of the gentleman thief. Part One of the French series Lupin was released on Netflix on 8 January, and has quickly made its way into the top 10 shows on Netflix for multiple countries, grappling with Bridgerton for the first place spot in many cases. ...


Review: Industry

11th January 2021

Ed Fernandez takes a look at the new BBC drama series. Industry is a programme that somehow manages to keep you entirely distressed while you watch it, and yet you crave every sweet second. If someone five weeks ago had told me a programme about graduates at a finance company could be such a potent ...


Family Canon: The (proletari)cat in the hat

31st December 2020

The first entry in our Family Canon series, covering the films and TV shows we watched over and over as children. The Cat in the Hat, the live-action adaptation of Dr. Seuss’ classic children’s book, reigns supreme in my family canon. Mike Myers’ chef-d’oeuvres operates on its own plane of existence – one of simultaneous ...


Is this the end of the cinematic experience?

30th December 2020

With the recent closure of Cineworld and Picturehouse cinemas, many are asking the horrifying question: is this the end of the cinema industry? My gut answer to this question is no, I do not think this will be the end of cinemas. Cinemas offer a unique viewing experience that cannot be mimicked. I think that ...