Review: Limbo (GFF)

7th March 2021

Limbo follows the emotional journey of a Syrian refugee in Scotland, as he both passes the time with his friends and overcomes a crisis of identity. Limbo is a film that will touch your heart on multiple occasions. The second film from Scottish director Ben Sharrock tells the story of asylum seekers and refugees living ...


Hidden Scottish music gems

7th March 2021

The Glasgow Guardian shines a light on our favourite, often (sadly) forgotten Scottish musical talents – all of which deserve centre stage on your Spotify playlists! Scotland has produced some of the biggest names in the music industry both in Britain and on the global stage. Taking a look back over the music scene in Glasgow ...


Review: Drunk Tank Pink by Shame

7th March 2021

On their sophomore album the South London outfit significantly deepen, mature, and ultimately improve their post-punk sound. Never a nation to be outdone in terms of angst, British artists have been at the forefront of post-punk’s recent rejuvenation. Bands like IDLES, HMLTD, Fontaines D.C., and The Murder Capital (to name just a few) have been ...


Bringing Bach back: the Bridgerton effect

4th March 2021

Megan McManus argues it’s time we re-examine classical music, and why it deserves a place “Bach” in the charts – no longer relegated to study playlists. Shonda Rhimes’ latest regency romance series Bridgerton has certainly made waves in recent weeks. With its historicised Gossip Girl context, eye-catching costumes and raunchy sex scenes – the series has ...


Can too much choice be a bad thing?

4th March 2021

After Disney’s announcement of its extensive slate of upcoming projects, Tenzin Murry explores this explosion of entertainment. 2020 was a year defined by being locked down and indoors. A recent Ofcom study confirmed that many people had little else to do besides binge their way through box-sets in Netflix’s back-catalogue. Viewing figures for streaming services ...


Memories of a Gig: Kasabian

2nd March 2021

In this new series, we ask students in these socially distanced, isolating times to think back to a happier time when they were crammed in a venue, having warm liquid thrown over them they hoped was a cheap pint, and losing their voice the next day after scream-singing along to lyrics. It was a simpler ...


An album that soundtracks my life: The Doors by The Doors

2nd March 2021

In the series Albums That Soundtrack Our Lives, we hear from a selection of students reflecting individually on albums that shaped their life in one way or another. Whether it’s a breakup, loss, nostalgia or good memories shared with friends; we look at albums that have changed the lives of different people from different places, ...


Review: Home Body by Rupi Kaur

2nd March 2021

A poetry collection that only scratches the surface. Home Body is Rupi Kaur’s third work, following her widely-acclaimed and hugely-popular first and second poetry books, Milk and Honey and The Sun and Her Flowers. The Instafamous poet has been the recipient of commendation and criticism in equal measure. Before I dive in, I need to ...


Review: The Dig

1st March 2021

Netflix film The Dig tells the story of the discovery of Sutton Hoo. Before 1938, one of the biggest archaeological finds in Britain remained deep under burial mounds on an estate in Ipswich, East Anglia. Curious about what was under these mounds, estate owner Edith Pretty contacted Ipswich Museum in summer 1937, and the following ...


If you watch one film this month…

28th February 2021

Our monthly tips have a Covid-style reboot as inhouse film buff Madeline shares her top film recommendations for each culture subsection.  Music: Inside Llewyn Davis (BFI Player) The best of the Coens’ unparalleled filmography, Inside Llewyn Davis is a fictionalised adaptation of The Mayor of MacDougal Street, the autobiography of influential folk musician Dave Van ...