Science & Tech



How to deal with fake news on your timeline

22nd June 2020

Isobel Thomas-Horton Writer What to do to challenge fake news on social media. “Fake News” always seemed to me to be something distinctly American, like spray cheese or high school doping scandals. Their independence and constitutionally entrenched distrust of authority struck me as the perfect breeding ground for what Kellyanne Conway memorably coined “alternative facts”. ...


Contact tracing apps: how do they concern me?

10th June 2020

Joseph Evans Writer A discussion of the issues and limitations of contact tracing apps and why they are so controversial. A contact tracing app to help limit the spread of coronavirus has been discussed for months. The original proposal was that it would help to limit the initial spread of the virus back in the ...


Paranoia is its own pandemic

2nd June 2020

Graham Peacock Writer Graham Peacock discusses the harmful effects of paranoia and its recent political history. There’s a picture of the artist David Wojnarowicz taken in 1988 at the height of the HIV crisis that feels particularly poignant to me in the current climate. In it, Wojnarowicz, seen from behind, wears a customised denim jacket ...


Huawei and the 5G network

26th April 2020

Adam Verson Writer When we are told to worry about so many things, should the Chinese government spying on us really be a concern? A new network system has been in the works since 2018. In the last six months, the four major UK network providers (Vodafone, EE, O2, and Three) have all launched 5G ...


Pseudoscience in The Goop Lab

26th April 2020

Megan Farrimond Writer Megan Farrimond examines the Netflix documentary on Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle brand. Since Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle e-commerce brand Goop was launched in 2008 it has come under much scrutiny from trained medical professionals and scientists. The criticism levelled at the “L.A. lifestyle” being pushed by the brand, is due to the false and ...


Bridging the divide between arts and sciences

4th April 2020

  Imogen Miller Culture Columnist – Music Should scientists study moral philosophy? In the middle of the wilderness, with no contact with the outside world, two groups of twelve year old boys are forced to compete for resources. They reach their limits, hysteria ensues and the two groups become violent. You may think I’m describing ...


Riding the gravitational wave

23rd March 2020

Graeme Eddols Writer Graeme Eddols explores the significance of the University’s contribution to gravitational wave research. Gravitational waves are caused by some of the most energetic events in the universe. Their existence was predicted by Albert Einstein over 100 years ago in his famous General Theory of Relativity, and it has taken almost the same ...


Is Airbnb ruining our cities?

20th March 2020

Marine Fleury Writer Marine Fleury analyses the negative effects of Airbnb on the availability of housing From using air mattresses for an informal bed and breakfast to becoming the preferred short-term rent platform worldwide, Airbnb has grown incredibly fast in the 13 years since it was founded. Such growth seems set to continue, evidenced by ...


Aphantasia: Blind in the mind’s eye

17th March 2020

Max Kelly Travel Editor Max Kelly explores the condition in which people lack a mind’s eye, and its history. Try to picture your favourite meal. How does it look? Or perhaps, try to picture a colourful sunset. Could you do it? For people who suffer from aphantasia this is not possible. This condition means that ...


James Dean, the latest victim of nonconsensual digital re-creation

1st March 2020

Angus Gillies Deputy Culture Editor – Film and TV Cast in a new action film, should we be worried about the lack of ethics needed to recreate actors?  The last few months have given an alarming contemporary significance to the phrase “turn in one’s grave”. James Dean, counterculture icon and the star of classics Rebel ...