Review Archives - Page 6 of 20 - The Glasgow Guardian



Self Esteem Review: Making the Barrowlands feel like Hampden

7th March 2023

A pop prophet in her ascendancy. Months prior to Self Esteem’s Barrowlands debut, a friend told me to get to her show as soon as humanly possible, likening the performance to a religious experience. By the close of the main set, the triumphant and soul-baring song I Do This All the Time, it’s impossible to ...


Glasgow Film Festival 2023: Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman

7th March 2023

A beautifully realised animated collage of Murakami short stories. Pierre Földes’ Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, which adapts several short stories by Haruki Murakami, combines a widely ambitious scope with a script deeply faithful to its source material. The film, Mr. Földes’ feature debut, forgoes adaptation of a single story, electing to weave together a handful ...


Glasgow Film Festival 2023: Riceboy sleeps

7th March 2023

A honest and heart-wrenching depiction of the Asian-Canadian Experience. One of the listed influences of the Glasgow Film Festival is the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), as it tries to emulate their “‘festival of festivals’ supporting grassroots organizations with a focus on audiences”. It is no wonder that Glasgow is host to the UK ...


Glasgow Film Festival 2023: God’s creatures

5th March 2023

A fascinating, yet ultimately dissatisfying, exploration of what it means to be the mother of a beast, toeing the line between victim and villain. Featured as one of the most recognisable titles in this year’s Glasgow Film Festival, Saela Davis and Anna R. Holmer’s film God’s Creatures had so much potential. Set in a small ...


Glasgow Film Festival 2023: How To Blow Up a Pipeline

3rd March 2023

Ethical and practical questions persist in this dive into the unflinching, uncomfortable context behind direct action. Why To Blow Up a Pipeline is perhaps a more appropriate title for the book this climate crisis thriller is based on. Yet Andreas Malm’s theoretical and intellectual justification of direct action, sabotage and property destruction in tackling the ...


Glasgow Film Festival 2023: My Name is Alfred Hitchcock

3rd March 2023

A prolific movie director from Hollywood’s Golden Age appeals to modern viewers. Over 100 years after the premiere of his first feature film, the voice of Alfred Hitchcock (via the brilliant impressionist Alistair McGowan) calls to us modern people with our 5G phones. Already renowned as “the Master of Suspense” with his cinematography dissected by ...


The Last of Us Review: “Heart-wrenching yet not quite crushing”

3rd March 2023

The writers show off their ability to walk the line of tension and warmth with exemplary care. Before the series adaptation, I was unaware of the prominence of The Last of Us among the gaming community. In all honesty, it was the announcement of Pedro Pascal in a leading role that initially perked my ears ...


Avatar 2 Review: Male, pale, stale and straight

3rd March 2023

Best described as a damp squib.  The sequel to 2009’s grand epic, Avatar: The Way of Water, is a predictable and tired narrative packaged in a breath-taking piece of cinematography. Pandora is the epitome of natural beauty but with a delightful sci-fi twist, and the expensive but worth it technology involved makes this world feel ...


The Whale Review: Uncomfortable melancholy

3rd March 2023

An emotional journey into the depths of self-destruction. Darren Aronofsky has done it again. The master of evoking discomfort and emotional terror has produced yet another film drenched in melancholy and uncomfortable situations. However, in this instance, things are much more toned down. There’s no frantic psychosexual paranoia as in Black Swan, or the manic ...


The edges are blurry now: Reviewing Black Country, New Road’s live album

28th February 2023

An exploration of the small-scale issues with BCNR’s Live at Bush Hall. “Look at what we did together, BCNR, friends forever.” Black Country New Road’s Live at Bush Hall has all the hallmarks of a final goodbye. The performance is framed like a prom, with its protagonists dressed in decaying school-dance garb, as if stumbling ...