series



Unlearning… ‘I’m not like other girls’

27th February 2021

This new series uncovers what societal expectations our writers are working towards unlearning. In this instalment, Rachel Campbell explores the idea that young girls have to choose between smart and pretty when cultivating an identity for themselves. I have, for as long as I can remember, felt that my intelligence defined me. In primary school, ...


Home Comforts: Flavours of Greece

14th February 2021

Callum explores his personal connection to Greek food in the next instalment of our longest-running series. At this time of year when meeting new people, whether it be in seminars, sports teams or societies, we are often faced with those awkward ice breakers. The dreaded “tell us something interesting about you”, which seems to have ...


A book that changed my life: Everything I Know About Love

13th February 2021

Dorota reviews Dolly Alderton’s much-celebrated memoir about friendship. I thought pinpointing a single book in my entire existence that changed my life would be fairly difficult, but to be honest, there’s one book that’s lived in my head rent-free ever since I read it: Everything I Know About Love by Dolly Alderton.  Thanks to its ...


Movements that shaped us: Rave

10th February 2021

In a continuation of our Movements that shaped us series, Megan Farrimond takes a look at the 1990s rave movement and the culture surrounding what the government calls “the succession of repetitive beats”. When acid house hit the UK, it changed the way dance music was consumed. Taking the amateur DJ to the streets, warehouses, ...


Musicians of Glasgow Uni: Loup Havenith

6th February 2021

A continuation of the Musicians of Glasgow Uni series, Music Editor Jodie Leith delivers some quick-fire questions to our music-making students. Highlighting the rich musical talent gracing our (online) lectures, we take a look at musician’s background, music, interests, and how they’re finding life as a student at UofG (in a pandemic). This time, The ...


Why should we unlearn?

5th February 2021

This new series uncovers what societal expectations our writers are working towards unlearning. In the first installment, Views Editor Emily Hay explores what unlearning is and why it’s so important. The rise of the Instagram infographics in 2020 brought with it a term which many had never come across before: unlearning. A quick google search ...


Hidden gems: Deep Red

2nd February 2021

For the first entry in our hidden gems series, in which writers offer their case for reappraisal of lost masterpieces, Alex Enaholo takes on Giallo with Dario Argento’s Deep Red. When I was 13 years old and watching Scream for the first time, everything about it called to me. The excessive violence – I mean, ...


Future World Changers: changing the world through poetry

14th January 2021

In this article, The Glasgow Guardian interviews Shehzar Doja, founder of The Luxembourg Review, and a PhD student of Creative Writing at the University of Glasgow. Shehzar’s passion for poetry and the impact it has had on his life made him want to use it to change the world. This ambition prompted him to apply ...


A book that changed my life: The Greeks

11th January 2021

Mahee Mustafa recounts what Ancient Greece can teach us about freedom. The most valuable thing one can glean from a work of literature is insight into one’s own psyche. Although command of language, deft characterisation, and excavation of universal themes are all important, a book is ultimately worth nothing if it does not reveal a ...


Family Canon: The (prolitari)cat in the hat

31st December 2020

The first entry in our Family Canon series, covering the films and TV shows we watched over and over as children. The Cat in the Hat, the live-action adaptation of Dr. Seuss’ classic children’s book, reigns supreme in my family canon. Mike Myers’ chef-d’oeuvres operates on its own plane of existence – one of simultaneous ...